Recommended Reading

Many of the organizations that focus on gifted students provide a recommended reading (library) section or newsletters on their website (see below) that focuses on a variety of topics such as learning about gifted, social and emotional issues, and parenting the gifted. Be sure  to check them out!

 

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NCTM - National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, Executive Summary, Catalyzing Change in High School Mathematics

NCTM - National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, Executive Summary, Catalyzing Change in High School Mathematics Initiating Critical Conversations Rather than pushing (most) students into advanced and tracked math courses, the article suggests that students complete deeper, rather than wider, study of mathematical principles.

Link HERE.

Watch Carol Dweck's Speech: 'The Journey to a Growth Mindset' (Video)

Watch Carol Dweck's Speech: 'The Journey to a Growth Mindset' (Video) Carol Dweck, the Stanford University professor and author of "Mindset: The New Psychology of Success" is renowned for her research that shows individuals with a "growth mindset" — an understanding that their talent and abilities are not "fixed" and can be developed — are more likely to achieve. Her work has gained traction and led many educators to rethink the way they teach.

How to Raise a Creative Child. Step One: Back Off

How to Raise a Creative Child. Step One: Back Off: Child prodigies rarely become adult geniuses who change the world. We assume that they must lack the social and emotional skills to function in society. When you look at the evidence, though, this explanation doesn’t suffice: Less than a quarter of gifted children suffer from social and emotional problems. A vast majority are well adjusted — as winning at a cocktail party as in the spelling bee.What holds them back is that they don’t learn to be original.

Existential Depression in Gifted Children

Existential Depression in Gifted Children  Gifted and talented persons are more likely to experience a type of depression referred to as existential depression. Although an episode of existential depression may be precipitated in anyone by a major loss or the threat of a loss which highlights the transient nature of life, persons of higher intellectual ability are more prone to experience existential depression spontaneously.

Educating an Original Thinker

Educating an Original Thinker: How teachers and parents can identify and cultivate children who think creatively and unconventionally. In his new book, Originals:

How Non-Conformists Move the World, the writer, Wharton professor, Adam Grant explores the circumstances that give rise to truly original thinkers.

The Gift of Emotional Overexcitabilities

The Gift of Emotional Overexcitabilities: Recent vulnerability research by Brene Brown (Brown, 2010) has shown that the origin of all creativity, innovation, and authenticity is vulnerability. For many gifted individuals it is their emotional overexcitabilities that are the source of their greatest vulnerabilities. The discovery that these vulnerabilities are also the birthplace of their ability to use their gifts in creative and innovative ways serves as a wakeup call to reassess our perceptions on these overexcitabilities and how we address them in our young gifted.

Underachievers under-the-radar: How seemingly successful gifted students fall short of their potential

Underachievers under-the-radar: How seemingly successful gifted students fall short of their potential Research has shown that many gifted children are underachievers who fail to reach their potential.Some mask their abilities so they can fit in with peers, some stop caring and receive barely passing grades, and some drop out altogether. Academic achievement becomes meaningless and their intrinsic love of learning seems to vanish. This article address 3 tips to help the underachieving gifted students. 

Two Lessons on How to Support Gifted Kids

Two Lessons on How to Support Gifted Kids
This article is written by By Steven Pfeiffer who has worked with high-ability kids for more than 35 years in a variety of capacities in his clinical practice as a psychologist. 

Basic Recipe for Parent Advocates

Basic Recipe for Parent Advocates: As parents, we are our children’s first advocates* – their first voice. Most parents advocate for their children in some way, but for those of us with gifted children, we often come to that point quite by accident. Parents seek ways to guarantee that their child’s needs are appropriately addressed.So how does a parent approach the teacher, principal or counselor and share concerns that affect their child within the confines of a classroom?  This article is one basic recipe called for Homestyle Advocacy that the author has found successful.

Best, Brightest — and Saddest?

Best, Brightest — and Saddest? Between May 2009 and January 2010, five Palo Alto teenagers ended their lives by stepping in front of trains. And since October of last year, another three Palo Alto teenagers have killed themselves that way, prompting longer hours by more sentries along the tracks. The Palo Alto Weekly refers to the deaths as a “suicide contagion.”And while mental health professionals are rightly careful not to oversimplify or trivialize the psychic distress behind them by focusing on any one possible factor, the contagion has prompted an emotional debate about the kinds of pressures felt by high school students in epicenters of overachievement.

Why I pulled my son out of a school for 'gifted' kids

Why I pulled my son out of a school for 'gifted' kids.  One family's perspective on gifted schooling and why it is important to consider how they are learning and not just what they are learning.

Two Lessons on How to Support Gifted Kids

Two Lessons on How to Support Gifted Kids. 
This article is written by By Steven Pfeiffer who has worked with high-ability kids for more than 35 years in a variety of capacities in his clinical practice as a psychologist. 

How Parents Can Support Girls' Academic Success in STEM

How Parents Can Support Girls' Academic Success in STEM  Helping our daughters recognize science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) in their daily lives, even in tasks like feeding the dog, baking a cake, or packing a suitcase, supports and encourages their STEM interests and abilities. Often young girls, even those who are very bright, aren’t accustomed to thinking of themselves as being good at science or math 

How parents of talented children hold the line between supporting and pushing 

How parents of talented children hold the line between supporting and pushing How can well-meaning parents tell the difference between supporting and pushing? Writing a chapter in “How to Bring Up a Genius!,” psychologist Carol Bainbridge defines the difference this way: “Basically, nurturing is child-centered while pushing is adult-centered. When we nurture we follow the child’s lead, but when we push we want the child to follow us, to do what we want him or her to do.”

Harnessing the Power of Productive Struggle 

Harnessing the Power of Productive Struggle  Some teachers build in productive struggle into the student's educational experience. To ensure plenty of time for puzzling and reasoning, some start their lesson with independent work time, moving into the teacher-centered portion of the lesson only after students had been studying the problem, first independently and then in pairs, for more than half of their study block.Why would a teacher decide to structure a math lesson this way?

‘Impossible’ Homework Assignment? Let Your Child Do It