Literacy

PHILOSOPHY

Literacy is commonly referred to as reading, writing, speaking and listening. As our world relies more on visual communications, literacy also involves viewing. Thinking or meaning-making is at the core of these processes, and literacy proficiency develops over a lifetime. 

Although literacy is a core English Language Arts focus, for learners to become proficient readers and writers,  they develop their literacy in every subject class through the vocabulary, concepts, text structures, and general communication patterns used by people in that discipline.

TIPS FOR DEVELOPING CHILDREN'S WRITING SKILLS

In Pam Allyn's new book, Your Child's Writing, the author offers five keys to help children write: 

  1. Word Power  - encourage children to practice using new words by writing notes to them, and have them respond back to you in writing; create a "word jar" with your child's favorite words; talk about new words heard in songs.
  2. Read aloud - this is a great opportunity to teach kids about grammar, syntax and other structures of writing.  Use a variety of genres such as poetry, non-fiction, and even picture books.
  3. Identity - just as your child's favorite color changes, so too will their style of writing.  Exposing your child to a variety of writing styles/authors will help them develop their own writing identity. 
  4. Time - to show the importance and value of writing skills, carve out a consistent time to encourage writing. 
  5. Environment  - create an environment that encourages aspiring writers:  a surface for writing, writing tools, good lighting and a little bit of inspiration. 

K-5 Literacy

READING DIFFERENTIATION

Common to all English Language Arts classes in District 205 is the use of Essential Concept Questions that provide opportunity for students of all backgrounds and reading levels to construct deeper understanding throughout each unit. Reading instruction flows from whole group to small group instruction and practice in leveled materials that best match learner needs. Students striving to read at grade level may work in class as well as in an intervention program with a Reading Specialist. Students reading above grade level typically participate in the Advanced reading level. Students practice further by reading independently and at home. Students who demonstrate that they require extended challenge beyond differentiated classroom work may work also in a REACH literacy group..


K-5 ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS (ELA)

School District 205 is committed to the implementation of a comprehensive core curriculum to ensure that it is:

  • Rigorous
  • Relevant
  • Anchored in Standards
  • Informed by Meaningful Assessments

The curriculum is anchored in the Common Core State Standards, which are intended to serve as the basis for student assessment in Illinois. Our goal is for students to master the critical skills that serve as the foundation for success in reading and writing but also be able to apply these skills to think critically and solve problems, collaborate and communicate with others, and access, analyze, and evaluate information.

LITERACY LOCKER

Fountas and Pinnell

8/9/17 6:22 AM - Nikki Tammaru

K-5 Scope and Sequence for Schoolwide and Lucy Calkins

8/8/17 1:02 PM - Nikki Tammaru

K-5 Literacy Handbook

9/1/17 10:49 AM - Nikki Tammaru

Words Their Way (2nd-5th Grades)

8/9/17 6:25 AM - Nikki Tammaru

6-8 Literacy

School District 205 is committed to the implementation of a comprehensive core curriculum to ensure that it is:

  • Rigorous
  • Relevant
  • Anchored in Standards
  • Informed by Meaningful Assessments

The curriculum is anchored in the Common Core State Standards, which are intended to serve as the basis for student assessment in Illinois. Our goal is for students to master the critical skills that serve as the foundation for success in reading and writing but also be able to apply these skills to think critically and solve problems, collaborate and communicate with others, and access, analyze, and evaluate information.


English 6-8
Middle school English meets for one block period every day. The English 6-8 courses use a variety of text including short stories, articles and novels. Activities engage students in practicing and applying reading and writing process strategies and skills, with an emphasis on understanding and using literary elements and devices related to narration, analysis, and argument. Students also work to expand their knowledge of content and academic vocabulary. 

9-12 Literacy